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Melanie Schiff and Jeff Whetstone Opening Reception

Start:
May 17, 2013 6:00 pm
End:
May 17, 2013 9:00 pm
Cost:
Free with admission
Venue:
CAM Raleigh
Phone:
919 513 0946
Address:
409 W. Martin St., Raleigh, 27603

Melanie Schiff: The stars are not wanted now
Selected photographs | 2006 - 2012
On view May 17 - September 1, 2013

Jeff Whetstone—FRAME/ABLATE
On view May 17 - June 10, 2013

Opening Reception
Friday, May 17, 2013
6:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
The opening reception for Melanie Schiff and Jeff Whetstone are in conjunction with CAM Raleigh’s May Third Friday program that includes after-hours access to the galleries and a suggested donation bar. The reception is free with museum admission. Free for Members.

Visit camraleigh.org/exhibitions/2013schiff and camraleigh.org/exhibitions/2013whetstone for additional information.

The stars are not wanted now is the largest and most comprehensive presentation of Melanie Schiff’s photographs to date. Spanning the years 2006 through 2012, and bracketing the period of Schiff’s move from Chicago to Los Angeles in 2008, the exhibition illuminates ongoing concerns in the artist’s investigations of light, atmosphere, place and landscape. “The stars are not wanted now” is taken from a line in W.H. Auden’s “Funeral Blues,” an oft-recited elegiac poem decreeing the suspension of time, light and communication. The phrase alludes to the imprints of time and memory apparent in Schiff’s solitary meditations. A close reading of the title also suggests Schiff’s poetic engagement with penetrating natural light, the role of natural phenomena in her subject matter, and her transition from incorporating the histories of icons in popular music, or “stars.”

FRAME/ABLATE is a ten minute video projection in which Jeff Whetstone examines edible plants and human tissue through a Scanning Electron Microscope, an instrument made for scientific analysis. Instead of using light to make the objects visible, the electron microscope showers the object with electrons. The resulting image is precise, yet grainy, flickering, and monochromatic like early cinematic experiments.